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Avant collaborates with hit maker Warryn Campbell on two Private Room tracks, the infectious mid- groove "Heaven" and "Have Some Fun," an anthem dedicated to the Good Time. "The other CDs were me," says Avant, "but the new songs are more intimate." Private Room is Avant up close and personal.
Avant collaborates with hit maker Warryn Campbell on two Private Room tracks, the infectious mid- groove "Heaven" and "Have Some Fun," an anthem dedicated to the Good Time. "The other CDs were me," says Avant, "but the new songs are more intimate." Private Room is Avant up close and personal.
602498612002
Avant - Private Room

Details

Format: CD
Label: GEF
Catalog: 156712
Rel. Date: 12/09/2003
UPC: 602498612002

Private Room
Artist: Avant
Format: CD
Used: Available
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Avant collaborates with hit maker Warryn Campbell on two Private Room tracks, the infectious mid- groove "Heaven" and "Have Some Fun," an anthem dedicated to the Good Time. "The other CDs were me," says Avant, "but the new songs are more intimate." Private Room is Avant up close and personal.

Reviews:

''Private Room'' is the third album by Avant. It peaked at number four on ''Billboard'' magazine's Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart. and number 18 on the ''Billboard'' 200 chart. The single "Read Your Mind", with guest rapper Snoop Dogg, reached #13 on ''Billboards Hot 100 chart. - Wikipedia

What do expect from an R&Balbum these days ?? Well, what about rocking, well crafted beats, lush arrangements and smooth vocals that lure the ladies onto the floor, so the boys will follow.

Simply put, Avant's "Private Room" delivers all this and then some. The intro opens the door to this room, giving you just over a minute of luscious soulful business that leaves you begging for more. Then straight into "AV" on which Avant details-immodestly-his sexual prowess. And then does the same on track 3, "Heaven," and on through the album. The procreative process is well detailed on this opus, and detractors may point to the lack of serious vocal content but when the grooves are this bump and grind inducing, really who is complaining.

Good times and good loving are invoked on "Heaven," over pretty keys and a squelchy bass-line, you just know how good this is going to sound at 3 AM on a big sound system, or at 6AM on a smaller, domestic system, perhaps in a bedroom. If you're a sucker for modern R&B, and I certainly am, this LP pays out in spades. "Have Some Fun" has an infectious piano hook and a free, fun vibe that'll sound wicked on a hot day near the beach.

Though Avant is no Marvin, he has a certain charm, the production's great, the tempos never get too hectic and it is simply a very groovy album. A couple of club jams round it out, but it's mostly for chilling to. So acquire and do just that.

 

A songwriter is usually spinning his wheels when he turns to the Incredibly Moving Climactic Key Change. Sure, the IMCKC has been done with aplomb lots of times (Earth, Wind & Fire's "After the Love Is Gone" for example) but more often it's a cheap ploy-and possibly indicative of a wrongheaded fondness for Chicago ballads. IMCKCs have abused the very name of modulation, and it takes something like Avant's "Have Some Fun" to remind you how nifty hopping around tonal centers can sound. The tune, written by producers Warren Campbell and Harold Lilly, Jr., shifts from the key of C# to the key of D and back again in a lilting cycle that leads Avant's slightly raspy tenor to all sorts of inspired turns.

Unfortunately the rest of Avant's third album rarely reaches that level. The closest runner-up is "Heaven," another dance-floor bid and the album's other Campbell-Lilly offering. "Heaven" makes explicit Private Room's debt to late-era Marvin Gaye with an elegant Midnight Love-like synth bassline, and a passage lifted from "Sexual Healing." Heavenly indeed, but when Campbell and Lilly decamp, Avant and producer-co-writer Steve Huff are stuck in less celestial quarters. The Michael Jackson-style adlib at the close of the ho-hum come-on "Av," for instance, arrives like a bottle of champagne after a long night of warm PBR Light, at which point it's too late to matter. "Phone Sex (That's What's Up)" tills the same barren soft-porn soil as Next's like-titled slow jam. And as if to put "Have Some Fun" into further relief, "Wanna Be Close" "resorts to a tacky climactic key change (twice!) taking the song from B flat to C-which is about the grade the album deserves.

 

"A songwriter is usually spinning his wheels when he turns to the Incredibly Moving Climactic Key Change. Sure, the IMCKC has been done with aplomb lots of times (Earth, Wind & Fire's ""After the Love Is Gone"" for example) but more often it's a cheap ploy-and possibly indicative of a wrongheaded fondness for Chicago ballads. IMCKCs have abused the very name of modulation, and it takes something like Avant's ""Have Some Fun"" to remind you how nifty hopping around tonal centers can sound. The tune, written by producers Warren Campbell and Harold Lilly, Jr., shifts from the key of C# to the key of D and back again in a lilting cycle that leads Avant's slightly raspy tenor to all sorts of inspired turns.

Unfortunately the rest of Avant's third album rarely reaches that level. The closest runner-up is ""Heaven,"" another dance-floor bid and the album's other Campbell-Lilly offering. ""Heaven"" makes explicit Private Room's debt to late-era Marvin Gaye with an elegant Midnight Love-like synth bassline, and a passage lifted from ""Sexual Healing."" Heavenly indeed, but when Campbell and Lilly decamp, Avant and producer-co-writer Steve Huff are stuck in less celestial quarters. The Michael Jackson-style adlib at the close of the ho-hum come-on ""Av,"" for instance, arrives like a bottle of champagne after a long night of warm PBR Light, at which point it's too late to matter. ""Phone Sex (That's What's Up)"" tills the same barren soft-porn soil as Next's like-titled slow jam. And as if to put ""Have Some Fun"" into further relief, ""Wanna Be Close"" ""resorts to a tacky climactic key change (twice!) taking the song from B flat to C-which is about the grade the album deserves.

 

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