Music Releases 09-07-18

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Paul McCartney

140g Double Vinyl, single jacket with 16 tracks (14 songs + 2 instrumentals).

 Paul McCartney invites you on a musical journey to Egypt Station, estimated time of arrival September 7, 2018 by way of Capitol Records. Sharing a title with one of Paul’s own paintings, Egypt Station is the first full album of all-new McCartney music since 2013’s international chart-topping NEW. Preceded by two of its tracks just released as double A-sides--plaintive ballad “I Don’t Know” and raucous stomper “Come On To Me”—Egypt Station was recorded between Los Angeles, London and Sussex, and produced (with the exception of one Ryan Tedder track) by Greg Kurstin (Adele, Beck, Foo Fighters).

 Of the forthcoming album’s enigmatic title, Paul says, “I liked the words ‘Egypt Station.’ It reminded me of the ‘album’ albums we used to make.., Egypt Station starts off at the station on the first song and then each song is like a different station. So it gave us some idea to base all the songs around that. I think of it as a dream location that the music emanates from.”

 True to the inspiration behind its title, Egypt Station’s 14 songs combine to convey a unique travelogue vibe. Between the opening and closing instrumentals “Station I” and “Station II,” each song finds Paul capturing a place or moment before transporting the listener seamlessly to the next destination. Stops along the way include an acoustic meditation on present day contentedness (“Happy With You”), a timeless anthem that would fit on virtually any album of any McCartney era (“People Want Peace”), and an epic multi-movement closer clocking in at seven minutes with a song suite structure harkening back to the days of Paul’s previous combos (“Despite Repeated Warnings”). The result is a kaleidoscopic journey through myriad musical locales and eras, yet firmly rooted in the here and now--with Paul’s singular unmistakable melodic and lyrical sensibility serving as a guide.

Paul McCartney
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Paul Simon

Produced by Simon and Roy Halee, who have worked together since the 1960s, the album features collaborations with a diverse array of artists who have joined Simon to lend fresh perspectives on 10 of the artist's favorite (though perhaps less-familiar) compositions drawn from the five-decade span of his illustrious solo career. Revisiting his repertoire, Simon has selected songs originally appearing on There Goes Rhymin' Simon (1973), Still Crazy After All These Years (1975), One-Trick Pony (1980), Hearts and Bones (1983), The Rhythm of The Saints (1990), You're The One (2000) and So Beautiful Or So What (2011), refreshing and transforming the compositions through new arrangements and a talented cast of guest musicians. Among the many artists joining Simon on In The Blue Light are jazz icons trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, guitarist Bill Frisell, drummers Jack DeJohnette and Steve Gadd and chamber ensemble quintet yMusic.

Paul Simon
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Alina Baraz

Alina Baraz surprises fans with a new 9-song album prelude, The Color of You, that includes 8 new songs and "Electric" feat. Khalid. The prelude is her first extended release since the chart-topping Urban Flora EP and 2017's viral hit, "Electric" featuring Khalid. Using color as a metaphor and a means of describing the discovery of new emotions, the project sees Alina thrive with her trademark vocal effervescence while exploring new sensual and striking production directions. The Color of You thematically explores young love and musically captivates with an allover bigger sound, reflective of today's updated pop genre, a mix of R&B and electronic styles.

Unfortunately there were some manufacturing delays on the Alina Baraz The Color of You merchandise. All CD and LP's will now street on September 7th.  Thank you for your patience.

Alina Baraz
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Spiritualized

Standard Jacket + Printed Inner Sleeve + Black Vinyl

Spiritualized
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The Coral

The Coral are an English band formed in 1996 in Holylake, England. Their past speaks volumes having sold over a million UK albums since their debut release in 2001, five of those hitting the Top 10, including the chart-topping Magic and Medicine (2003) and 8 Top 40 singles. Their self-titled album was nominated for the 2002 Mercury Music Prize and later voted the 4th Best Album of the Year by NME Magazine.

The Coral
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Mothers

Mothers attempt to exist in two places at once - both singular and collaborative, sprawling and concise, present and distant. Kristine Leschper, songwriter and founding member of the project, explains that it is in the space between opposites that she finds herself. The multifaceted is, by nature, fragmented - each facet reflecting a slightly different perspective of the whole. On their latest record, Render Another Ugly Method, the band attempts to gain an expanded view of its surroundings through splintered sound, thought, and image. Leschper began exploring songwriting when she moved to Athens, Georgia as a teenager. Inspired by the growth that studying art allowed her and energized by the buzzing southern town, she started to perform publicly in 2013 and quickly developed local acclaim for her stark, unflinchingly vulnerable songs. During this time, she met many local artists and musicians, among them Matthew Anderegg, whom she quickly recognized as an artistic kindred spirit and friend. The following year they began working together to flesh out and arrange a collection of songs she had written, which would become the project’s 2016 debut release, When You Walk A Long Distance You Are Tired. Released in 2016, the album kicked off a sprawling eight months of touring across the US, UK and Europe, as the group honed their take on left-of center indie rock with an explosive and surprising live show that displayed how forceful the songs translated to a full-band setting. " Within Mothers, Leschper and Anderegg have remained a creative constant, with other collaborators changing over time. Render Another Ugly Method sees the remnants of Leschper and Anderegg, Chris Goggans and Drew Kirby in musical conversation, through cut-up songs that were torn apart and rebuilt over and over again.

Mothers
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Yes

"Live At The Apollo", the new 3LP from Yes featuring Anderson, Rabin, Wakeman, is limited to 3,500 copies pressed on opaque orange 180 gram vinyl. This color will not be used on future pressings of the 3LP.

In 2016, Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin and Rick Wakeman brought together their incredible talents and long experience of working in Yes to take to the road for a series of concerts celebrating Yes’ musical legacy of the seventies, eighties and nineties. Yes featuring Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin and Rick Wakeman toured first in North America and then brought their live show to the UK in early 2017, including this performance captured at the Manchester Apollo. The band are in superb form in front of a sell-out crowd who are clearly loving every minute of the show which includes classic tracks such as Roundabout, Owner Of A Lonely Heart, And You And I, Hold On, Heart Of The Sunrise, Rhythm Of Love, I’ve Seen All Good People and many more.

Line-up
Jon Anderson (vocals, guitar, harp); Trevor Rabin (guitar, vocals); Rick Wakeman (keyboards)
With Lee Pomeroy (bass) and Lou Molino III (drums)

Yes
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The Posies

• Alternativae/power poster’s third full-length. • Remastered from original tapes. • 2-CD set expanded with 31 bonus tracks—15 previously unissued. • 2-LP cut at 45 RPM We began our career exactly 30 years prior by releasing a home-recorded cassette called Failure, which to our complete surprise became an instant favorite around the Northwest, earning us critical accolades, radio airplay, and major label interest all in a very short time. We were lucky to find ourselves living just a few doors down the road in Seattle from Arthur “Rick” Roberts and Mike Musburger, who agreed to join our band on bass and drums, respectively. Signed to Geffen Records, we recorded 3 releases, 1990’s Dear 23, Frosting On The Beater in 1993, and Amazing Disgrace in 1996. These three albums remain beloved by our fans; our most popular, most often cited, most requested works. However, over the years, the CDs have been in and out of print, there have been inconsistent presences on streaming, the LPs either long out of print or not issued at all depending on the territory. Good news: all that’s about to change. Frosting On The Beater is back, re-issued by Omnivore Recordings (who have, among many releases new and old, reissued our first album, Failure, plus releases by Big Star, Game Theory, etc). The album will be released as a double CD set: one CD containing the original album, remastered from the original analog tapes, plus enough bonus material to fill out the rest of the CD; and another full CD of more bonus material. Don’t expect just a repackaging of material already available on our 2000 boxed set of outtakes— 15 of Frosting On The Beater’s 31 bonus tracks on this reissue have never been heard! Frosting On The Beater will now stretch across two LPs and will be mastered at 45 rpm from the original tapes. We made the decision to stick to just the original albums for the vinyl release, to give it room to breathe across two glorious slabs of wax. So, if bonus tracks are your thing, the 2-CD set will have you covered Catch The Posies on their 30th Anniversary tour in 2018 too!

The Posies
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Bob Seger & The Last Heard

Heavy Music: The Complete Cameo Recordings 1966-1967 by Bob Seger & The Last Heard. This will be the first time ever that all records by the celebrated Detroit group will be made available since their origination as 45rpm singles. The collection is wrapped in a newly designed album package, sold as a single CD, a single 180-gram vinyl LP, and on all digital platforms. Featuring liner notes by the celebrated music writer Jim Allen, and original photographs and label art from the Cameo vaults.

Bob Seger & The Last Heard
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Tunng

Songs You Make At Night reunites founding members Sam Genders and Mike Lindsay (fresh from his LUMP side project with Laura Marling) and the rest of the Tunng gang for the first time since 2007's Good Arrows. The band formed in 2003 and have released 5 albums. This is their most electronic-leaning album to date. Press includes; NPR, Pitchfork, Paste, Magnet, The Guardian, The Times, Uncut, Mixmag. Sync placements on; Weeds, Elementary, Parenthood, How To Make It In America, The OC. w/ DL card.

Tunng
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Eric Bachmann

There was something sinister about Crooked Fingers, both the name of the project and the music that Eric Bachmann wrote at the helm of its ever-shifting lineups over 15 years. He retired the moniker a couple of years ago, but with his third album under his own name, the transformation feels gorgeous and final and irreversible: No Recover. The drunken louts and red devil dawns are a thing of the past now, monuments to a different time. Bachmann, husband and recent father, has some new lenses through which to view the world. But while No Recover is decidedly mellow and reflective, do not mistake it for the work of a relaxed, satisfied songwriter, sitting on some Georgia porch with a stalk of wheat between his lips, gently rocking a cradle with his foot and whistling an old tune. No, the Eric Bachmann of 2018 seems to view life with a sort of disgruntled maturity and righteous resignation. No Recover is both harrowing and beautiful, and its mellowness can be deceiving. The album is mostly just him, a classical guitar, some treated rhythm tracks, and otherworldly drop-ins from singer Avery Leigh Draut and guitarist Eric Johnson, Bachmann’s old pal from their Archers of Loaf days. He’s got a lot on his mind, only some of it pretty. The sunset on the album’s cover might be the end of a cruel world for the duo in “Jaded Lover, Shady Drifter,” who introduce No Recover; they feel like flip-side lovers, both sonically and lyrically, of the couple at the center of Bring On the Snakes’ “The Rotting Strip.” But that dark sentiment is quickly reversed with “Daylight,” one of Bachmann’s most stunning vocal performances ever: For a guy who earned his stripes by shredding his vocal cords in the ’90s, he sure can croon. And though the words cast some shadows—“fight for your life,” he implores—ultimately there is hope. “If you try, you can be loved.” Same goes, to a less direct degree, for “Waylaid,” the record’s jauntiest song, and a meditation on failure and love that leaves room for Johnson’s bright-but-mournful electric guitar to take center stage. But leave it to Bachmann to save the best for last: No Recover ends with one song for his wife and another for his son. “Wild Azalea,” for Liz Durrett—who also makes a brief appearance earlier in the album—is pure ’70s AM gold, including the tinge of sadness that the best of that era embraced. And “Dead and Gone” offers wistful, Bachmann-style comfort to a child. It’s vulnerable and giving, a lifetime promise that somehow intertwines regret and hopefulness. In that way, it perfectly encapsulates No Recover—and Bachmann himself—circa 2018. He’s got a lifetime of experience behind him, and a catalog that runs the gamut from fiery to scary to simply beautiful, sometimes all at once. But it also feels like a new beginning. Here’s to another 25 (or more!) years of watching him grow.

Eric Bachmann
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Escape-Ism

Notes on Escape-ism’s The Lost Record by Johnny Sincere When Escape-ism—nom de guerre of mythic rock ’n’ roll provocateur / theorist / revolutionary Ian Svenonius (performer, author, filmmaker, etc.)—announced the imminent release of its second long-player, The Lost Record, it shook the foundations of the hermetic swamp / tundra known as “underground music.” In the music world, a “lost record” is the term for an LP that was passed over, unappreciated—maybe not even released—but is later discovered, unearthed, and celebrated by in-the-know tastemakers and canny connoisseurs. Many of our culture’s favorite records are “lost” records; once despised or unheard, they’re now in heavy rotation in the clubhouse and in the car. Indeed, every group or musician dreams of making such a seminal record, with the heroic underdog narrative of: 1)Initial rejection by philistines 2)Clueless mishandling by the record company 3)An aimless amble through the desert of neglect and finally 4)Rediscovery and veneration However, the process a record has to go through to be “lost”—and then found again—is arduous. It’s also quite risky, since most lost records are really just lost: tossed aside and forgotten forever. So, when Escape-ism—the most exciting group in the world—announced its new and highly anticipated release The Lost Record, it created a commotion. For some, it seemed unfair for Escape-ism to jump ahead of the usual protocol and not go through the degradation that a historic “lost record” suffers: the endless time spent in a bin in the basement or a remote warehouse. Unshipped, unloved, unappreciated. But for Escape-ism, it seemed easier to circumvent the rigmarole and just get on with it. The Lost Record is a classic, destined to bewitch the minds, hearts, and dancing shoes of any rock ’n’ roll fan who happens to discover it, for as long as such creatures exist. Without the high-octane hype machine of the mind-control minstrels who hypnotize the hapless through the mass media, The Lost Record is bound for inevitable obscurity, but—with its timeless tunes, poignant message, and innovative sound—rediscovery and immortal status is equally assured! The Lost Record, being what it is, has enormous selling potential. Music enthusiasts will be thrilled to be the ones clever and kind enough to have rescued this platter from oblivion. The tunes—“Bodysnatcher,” “I’m a Lover (at Close Range),” “Exorcist Stairs,” “Nothing Personal,” and the rest—are foot-stomping classics as sung by the greatest song stylist and most dynamic performer of the epoch, Ian Svenonius. It’s a no-brainer that The Lost Record will be both unfairly neglected but also enshrined as a pinnacle achievement for subterranean civilization. Recorded in four different studios—Gaucho in Los Angeles, Flat Black in Iowa, Tonal Park in Takoma Park, MD, and at Club Blasé in DC—the record is the culmination of humanity’s attempt at something poignant, perverse, and poetically imperfect. Escape-ism is the work of Ian Svenonius, the author of Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock ’n’ Roll Group, The Psychic Soviet, and Censorship Now!!; the singer of The Make-Up, Chain & the Gang, XYZ, et cetera; the writer / director of What Is a Group?, the world’s only rock ’n’ roll sci-fi documentary exploitation film; and the host of “Soft Focus,” the musician-on-musician chat show that preceded all the pretenders. Escape-ism, though, isn’t a footnote in a laundry list of awards and citations; it’s the most vital thing going now. At festivals, clubs, art galleries, happenings, parties, and put-downs, Escape-ism is ripping up stages, unlocking cages. Escape-ism reinvents rock ’n’ roll the same way the jet engine reinvented travel. It’s an enchanting and terrifying answer to the mire of contentless, going-through-the-motions beat groups and electr...

Escape-Ism
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Waxahatchee

On September 7, Katie Crutchfield’s ever-shifting musical project Waxahatchee returns with the Great Thunder EP. Featuring a collection of songs written with now-dormant experimental recording group Great Thunder while Crutchfield was also writing the Waxahatchee albums Cerulean Salt and Ivy Tripp, the original recordings have mostly faded into obscurity. Unearthing and reimagining them with producer Brad Cook at Justin Vernon’s April Base studio in Wisconsin was a cathartic experience, she says. On the heels of last year’s critically acclaimed Out in the Storm, Crutchfield found herself looking to take a sharp turn away from the more rock-oriented influences of her recent records towards her more folk and country roots. “I would say that it is a complete 180 from the last record: super stripped-down, quiet, and with me performing solo, it’s a throwback to how I started,” writes Crutchfield. “Overall, the EP is a warm, kind of vibey recording.” Some of the songs on Great Thunder, like “Chapel of Pines” and “Singer’s No Star,” stayed the same and will be recognizable to those intensely familiar with Crutchfield’s catalog to date, while closer “Takes So Much” was built back up on piano from the bones of the original version, surprising even the songwriter: “Until then, I didn’t realize how beautiful this song was.” As Crutchfield entered April Base to record, she became ill but opted to forge on, beautifully stretching her voice to its emotional limits.

Waxahatchee
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Oliver Coates

For Shelley’s on Zenn-La, Oliver Coates designs a complex of bending truths and reverse walkways to vernal states. Open ears can peer down hidden aux channel corridors, while melodic patterns present two-way mirrors to rooms of other retinal colors. An endless euphoria is just beneath the dance floorboards of Shelley’s, and an inquisitiveness unencumbered by the institution of knowledge surrounding its frame and inhabitants. Shelley’s on Zenn-La was made between the Elephant and Castle neighborhood of London and a future dreamscape. In this realm out of time and space, Shelley’s (Laserdome) - a once-legendary late 80s / early 90s nightclub in the industrial town of Stoke-on-Trent in the north of England - can simultaneously exist on the fictional planet of Zenn-La, and can house a devotional, alien ritual of early UK rave culture, pioneering IDM, and deep minimalism. Much of the album’s construction extends from specific, self-imposed ambitions; particular palettes applied to individual creative ideas. These limitations become limitless manifestations of theme: two bass lines running in parallel (one cello, one synth), synthesized waveforms phasing with bowed acoustic drones and chords, synth sequences in nonstandard tuning sitting against folk melody in standard tuning. Coates made a lot of the music for Shelley’s in Renoise, composing drum sequences in hexadecimal numbers and pencil drawn waveforms and cementing specificity in the intricate, intelligent dance machinations. Some of Shelley’s tracks veer into and across FM synthesis. “I like hearing how one tone is enriched by another tone modulating the first, resulting in gleaming sets of new harmonics,” says Coates, “I started thinking about placing live cello playing into a chain of antagonism resulting in sounds I found beautiful." This instinct to poetically process sounds in real life (“sitting on the tube, thinking: I'd remove the low end on that, compress that, add reverb to that”) give Shelley’s an exploratory feel, both guided and unbound, autodidactic by undoing. Shelley’s opens with “Faraday Monument,” matching the enigmatic precedent of the Brutalist box in London the track is named after. chrysanthemum bear’s vocals oscillate over “A Church” singing lyrics to melt metal and minds. Large spaces adjacent to small enclosed ones house the voice of Malibu reading poetry within “Norrin Radd Dreaming.” “Cello Renoise” is built upon the image of two drummers playing to one click track as if in different booths. The great flautist, Kathryn Williams, recreated midi parts to end Shelley’s as a “Perfect Apple With Silver Mark.” Cellist, composer, and producer Oliver Coates has studied at the Royal Academy of Music, been an artist in residency at London’s Southbank Centre, and received the Royal Philharmonic Society Young Artist Award. Coates has contributed to the recordings of Radiohead, and collaborated with Laurie Spiegel and John Luther Adams. He has also been commissioned for string and electronic arrangements by visual artist Lawrence Lek, recorded with composer Jonny Greenwood on the scores for Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master and Phantom Thread and collaborated with musician Mica Levi on the 2016 album Remain Calm.

Oliver Coates
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HOK

HOK (House of Krazees) was the original name of the Detroit hip hop band that became Twiztid. After 25 years, HOK is re-releasing their albums on vinyl. The first is Home Sweet Home. This LP is standard weight, translucent yellow vinyl.

HOK
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Donna Missal

New Jersey singer Donna Missal may be a newbie but her passionately raw vocal proves she could capture even the most jaded listeners. With a mighty set of pipes akin to Lana Del Rey’s smoky pop softness, soulful strength and grit of Alabama Shakes’ Brittany Howard and the howl of Janis Joplin, the songstress’ trifecta appeal carries her with a lighted torch to the forefront of today’s crowded musical landscape.

Donna Missal
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Universal Eyes

Universal Eyes started as Universal Indians in Lansing Michigan, in the early shadows of the 90's, with Gretchen Gonzales (now Gonzales Davidson), Bryan "Rammer" Ramirez, & Johnny "Inzane" Olson. The trio started as a Jesse Harper cover band and managed to play every single basement that had a power outlet in the Tri county area. After moving to the Detroit area in the late 90's, Rammer was replaced by Aaron Dilloway and also joined by Nathan Young / a duo that were already in the throes of primitive electronic global domination that is WOLF EYES. The collective quartet played every basement, art space, record store, and club in the metro area that had a power outlet and could also handle the Michigan Progressive Underground audio sprawl. Around the dawn of the 2000's / Gretchen went full time with the moody & cold stylings of SLUMBER PARTY and after a wild Bowling Green Ohio gig, Olson joined WOLF EYES full time. After some drama that would make even Fleetwood Mac disappear into the shadows of suburbia and toss their EQ into a lonely fire, UNIVERSAL INDIANS appeared to have fate / faded into the packed history book pages of Michigan musical lore. As age and time seem to dust over wounds while magically healing them, the quartet met again in the northern suburbs of metro Detroit on a brisk spring Sunday in 2018. They hauled modern and ancient instruments into a home studio and just like that: the dream / nightmare had hot blood pumping thru its' duct-taped sound body once again, as if the missing years were nothing but a minute hurdle.

Universal Eyes
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Swamp Dogg

In 1970 the Southern soul music maverick Jerry Williams, Jr. made the most radical move of his career. Frustrated with music business politics Williams reinvented himself as Swamp Dogg, an irreverent anti-hero smashing the conventions of commercial R&B music. Swamp Dogg’s debut release Total Destruction to Your Mind featured a post-apocalyptic take on the Muscle Shoals’ sound, with lyrics inspired by the revolutionary politics and psychedelic drugs of the late ‘60s. The music on Total Destruction to Your Mind stood worlds apart from the formulaic pop tunes Williams started cutting in 1954 under the name Little Jerry, and Swamp Dogg hasn’t looked back since. Now, nearly fifty years after his debut release, Swamp Dogg stands on the precipice of another radical reinvention. His latest creation is titled Love, Loss, and Auto-Tune a nine song collection featuring production by Poliça’s Ryan Olson. Love, Loss, and Auto-Tune finds Swamp Dogg’s bluesy southern soul colliding head-on with 21st Century electronic music production techniques. The reference to Auto-Tune in the title is not incidental, the album’s sound is built around Swamp Dogg’s experimentation with the ubiquitous vocal processor. While Auto-Tune has become a fixture of the modern pop music landscape, this is Swamp Dogg’s first major exploration of the device. “Every time I listen to some new music that everybody thinks is the greatest thing since hot biscuits, it's full of Auto-Tune,” Swamp Dogg says. His use of Auto-Tune technology is not gratuitous. Like Kanye West on 808s & Heartbreak, Swamp Dogg utilizes the cold digital tone of Auto-Tune to convey a sense of emotional detachment during the album’s most anguished moments. "The songs are about being lonely,” Swamp Dogg says of Love, Loss, and Auto-Tune. The feeling of loneliness is particularly palpable on the hauntingly beautiful “I’ll Pretend,” which features vocals from Justin Vernon. Swamp Dogg describes the song as a character study about “a guy sitting in a restaurant by himself losing his fucking mind because he’s hoping his woman is gonna walk by, but she's at a Ramada Inn somewhere fucking somebody else to death." Despite the record’s overriding theme of loss, Swamp Dogg’s warped sense of humor is still intact. Let’s remember that we’re talking about an artist who released a “greatest hits” album in 1976 filled entirely with new songs! Swamp’s comic side is evident on “$$$ Hunting,” which rolls out with a funky Zapp-like bounce. There’s also “Sex With Your Ex,” where Swamp Dogg extols the benefits of the song’s title theme over random bursts of feedback and noise. Love, Loss, and Auto-Tune is a gem, a unique and unpredictable moment in the life of a unique and unpredictable artist that some consider a national treasure. “I might be the only one,” Swamp Dogg says. “But I think Swamp Dogg is a national treasure.”

Swamp Dogg
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Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears

New Album from Austin based blues and soul artist Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears. Follow-up to his 2017 album Backlash, which debuted at number 3 on the Billboard Top Blues Albums Chart. Sonically inspired by the hill country blues of Junior Kimbrough, cowpunk style of The Gun Club, and the southern soul of Stax. Recorded in their hometown of Austin, Texas, with Grammy award winning producer Stuart Sikes (The White Stripes, Cat Power, Modest Mouse)

Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears
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Korpiklaani

It’s been 3 years since their last album “Noita” was released and the Finnish Folk Metal Superstars KORPIKLAANI are about to offer their 10th studio album entitled “Kulkija” (“Wanderer”), set for a September 7th, 2018 release. Including 14 tracks, “Kulkija” is their longest album, but also their most natural sounding one, to date. From the first to the last tone, a unique atmosphere guides the listeners through a long journey. Instrumentally, the band continues the way they had already started with “Manala” (2012) to “Noita” (2015). Lyrically, the album deals with the album’s title character, the wanderer. He appears in every song and every single track represents one of his life situations. 

Korpiklaani